"Sandhill Crane"
(Grus canadensis)








Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost








Sandhill Cranes, are among the tallest birds in the world. It is a large bird that is gray in color with long legs and a long neck. Adult birds have a white cheek and a red forehead and crown. While wading or walking, the rump of the Sandhill Crane appears as though it has a "bustle: or hump hanging down. In Japanese art and culture, the crane is a symbol of fidelity, longevity, and grace. The Sandhill Cranes mate for life.





Size: stands 3 1/2 to 4 feet tall

Male: Tall, gray, heronlike bird with a dark red patch on its forehead; black bill. Some feathers on its back and its wings are rusty-colored.

Nest: Moundlike nest of marsh plants, grasses, and weeds, placed on the ground or in shallow water.

Eggs: 1-3; olive with dark marks.

Incubation: 28-32 days

Fledging: 90 days

Food: Feeds by picking or probing with bill, eating seeds, agricultural grains, and small animals.

Voice: A low-pitched "karooo karooo karooo".

Habitat: Summers on prairies and tundra; during winter, roosts on shallow water and feeds in agricultural fields.

In flight: They fly with their necks fully outstretched.

Mating Display: They do synchronized ballet-like ritual dances consisting of dipping, and bowing, leaping, stretching, and synchronized calls.





My personal notes...

The Sandhill Crane is a very beautiful bird...I particularly like the "rump" area of the birds feathers...so puffy and curly. The bird walks gracefully, and moves its head font and back as it walks. I've seen several Sandhill Cranes in my area...from next to the highways, to MacDonald's drive up menu area, to golf fields. Several I've seen just walking down a road...almost as if they obey the stop signs as they stop to check for safety before proceeding. Their feathers are bright and beautiful, and their long skinny legs look as though they bend them "backwards".









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