"Muscovy Duck"
(Cairina moschata)


"male"

"female"

"juvenile"

"duckling"






Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Muscovy "juvenile"
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
Muscovy "juvenile"
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
Muscovy "hen" and "ducklings"
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Tux" (drake)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Tux" (drake)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Midnight" and her newborn ducklings
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Frost" (hen)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Tux" & "Midnight" (drake & hen)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Omega" (juvenile)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Omega" (duckling)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Omega" (duckling)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
This is the day I named him "Omega". He was now the only one left...poor thing, all alone, cold, and wet.
"Omega" (juvenile)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Midnight" (hen and her eggs)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Omega" (juvenile)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Tux" & "Omega" (father & son)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"Omega" (juvenile)
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
"chocolate muscovys"
Photograph by

Stefanie Frischknecht
dominance "display"
Photograph by

Scott Perkins
dominance "display"
Photograph by

Scott Perkins
dominance "display"
Photograph by

Scott Perkins
Muscovy "drake"
Photograph by

Ski S. Diverscreek Waterfowl
Muscovy "drake"
Photograph by

Johnathan D. Roebuck






Moscovy ducks are a year-round Florida resident. They nest at the base of trees and roosts in trees at night. Also, it is not uncommon for them to next near human dwellings under shrubbery. They can be very aggressive ducks.


Size: 28"

Male: many color patterns from a glossy green-black to all white with some being black and white. Large bumpy patch of flesh, often red, around eyes and base of bill.

Female: smaller than male...lacking the bumpy skin patch.

Nest: ground; female builds: 1 brood per year

Eggs: 5-10

Incubation: 25-27 days; female incubates

Fledging: 60-70 days; female shows the young what to eat

Migration: non-migrator

Food: aquatic insects, grass, seeds





My personal notes...

I personally have enjoyed watching the Muscovy ducks in the nearby lake. The male ducks are huge, the females are much smaller. I find it very interesting that these type of ducks don't "quack" as do the other ducks in the lake...the males make a huffing or whisper sound, the hens make a very quiet odd sound, yet one of the hens makes a very high pitched squeak sound. They enjoy being fed, talked with, and particularly like to "catch" bread in their beak more than putting bread pieces on the grass. At present, there is a group of four Muscovy ducks at the lake...two males and two females. One of the females, that I named "Midnight", gave birth to 17 ducklings...but now, only one duckling remains, that I have named "Omega". There are many predators in the lake...huge turtles, and one small gator. These aren't the most attractive birds, but they are certainly quite different to watch compared to many other types of ducks. It has been a wonderful experience watching "Omega" grow up from that tiny duckling to being larger than his father now. He has such a nice disposition, and stops by to visit me every now and then.

I've noted that the Muscovy adult ducks fly to the tops of trees, are fast fliers, although they sound "heavy" in the air...like a "loud rhythmic beat". "Tux" the drake and "father" of ALL the Muscovy ducks here...can only do two flying laps across the lake...he's such a big bird who's favorite hobbies are eating and sex. He will be right in the middle of a meal, then all of a sudden "gets the urge"...hah. The females can out-fly him though, so if they "have a headache" they just keep flying laps across the lake to avoid "Tux"...who usually too tired after just two laps...






A special story about a Muscovy Duck named...

"Omega"

"First Day Of Life"






More Muscovy Duck Information:
"Muscovy Ducks Nests, Eggs & Babies"






Bird Wonderland

" Wonderland Website"


Copyright 1999-2009 Snow W. Frost
All rights reserved.
Reproduction without permission is strictly forbidden.