"African Goose"
(Anser cygnoides)







Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
African Goose with "Common Moorhen" in background
Photograph by

Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost
Photograph by
Snow W. Frost








The African Goose can be differentiated from Chinese by their heavy bodies and thick necks. Mature birds have a large, forward-projecting knob above their beaks. The bill and knob are black in the Brown form and orange in the White African.

Africans are the leanest of the heavy breeds and are popular for this reason, as well as for their stately looks. An adult gander and goose should weigh in at 20 and 18 pounds.

Breed History....The African Goose hould be of about the same size and height as the Embden Goose . The African Goosev appears physically a cross between the Toulouse Goose, and the Brown Chinese Goose, with some of the size and dewlap of the Toulouse Goose, and some of the carriage and "knob" of the Chinese Goose . The African Goose is said by some breeders to be a distinct breed imported from Africa, but the evidence a large genetic part of the Chinese is undisputable.

The African Goose is a very gentle breed that is much quieter than its skinny cousin. Available in white; brown (grey) and buff.


Egg Color: white

Egg Numbers: 10-20

Country Of Origin: China

Purpose: Eggs, meat, broody.





My personal notes...

The African Goose is quite a bird. A little noisy, awkward in its walk, and territoral. I thought the colors are truly beautiful, and noticed how "prominent" the black knob is at the top of the beak. It seems to enjoy digging in the ground dirt for whatever reason.





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